[History] Stylish Open-Source Status as of 2017



  • The following is an exact repost from my thread on the userstyles.org forums – with all the shady business around those parts, I thought I would post it here as it gives some background history of what led up to the Stylish analytics affair that prompted the Stylus fork – If there is a better place on the forum, please move it or repost it there.


    At this time, there are no links to source code anywhere easily visible on the UserStyles website for either the UserStyles server, or the Stylish extension. Is UserStyles/Stylish still open source at all?


    There are posts on this forum which reference the Github repository stylish-userstyles/userstyles as though it were the official repository; although this repository does not contain any activity after 2016-12-09, and the latest commit from Jason Barnabe (the original developer) was on 2015-06-26.

    The companion repository for the Stylish client on this Github account, stylish-userstyles/stylish, lists the latest commits as from Jason Barnabe on 2016-08-01, around the time the project ownership was transferred to Justin Hindman. Most confusing about all of this is that the latest release listed in this repository is 2.0.3, even though its latest commit is just days before the release of 2.0.7 on the Firefox addons site.

    Also on this account, there is a repository for the chrome extension, stylish-userstyles/stylish-chrome, whose latest commit is from Justin Hindman (the current lead developer last I heard) on 2017-03-16. However, this commit is about version 1.7.6, the latest release in this repository is 1.5.1, yet the current release on the chrome store today is 1.8.3?

    I can’t make sense of this.



  • They probably just stopped pushing their code to GH


  • Stylus developer

    When the new owners pushed their first update, users complained in the forum that they weren’t updating Github. At the time, they were still pretending that Stylish wasn’t bought by SimilarWeb (an analytics company), so they did update Github. Problem with open source is, if you’re adding sleazy spyware code, everyone can easily see exactly what you’re doing. Once people started pointing out the shady shit they were up to, they quit updating Github. Once users realized what was going on and started consistently complaining in the forums, they abandoned the forums.

    Obviously, they could care less about continuing the open source nature of the project. As far as legality, that’s pretty irrelevant. AFAIK, the only one who could possibly take issue with it would be the original dev, and he sold everything, including the extensions and website, to SimilarWeb. It’s bought and paid for, so it’s pretty much theirs to do with as they please now.